Impaired
Carrie LevyThu 22 Sep 2005 - Sun 16 Oct 2005
Following the publication of Carrie Levy's first monograph by Trolley 51 Months, Trolley Gallery now presents a new body of photographs in a forthcoming show 'Impaired'. These large-scale colour photographs describe a kind of 'anti-portraiture' as she captures the body naked and with the face hidden to remove the identity, thereby directing the viewer towards the body for interpretation of the portrait.
Following the publication of Carrie Levy's first monograph by Trolley 51 Months, Trolley Gallery now presents a new body of photographs in a forthcoming show 'Impaired'. These large-scale colour photographs describe a kind of 'anti-portraiture' as she captures the body naked and with the face hidden to remove the identity, thereby directing the viewer towards the body for interpretation of the portrait.

The poses are awkward to view, assimilated from recent images of torture in Iraq, and combine several genres of photography including performance, documentary and portraiture. Taken in the home of the sitter and using existing furniture as props to create the scene, the photographs examine how we deal with identity when we are not given facial details, as well as the power the photographer has over the image they create, by controlling what is presented to the viewer.



"My photography concentrates on ideas of confinement, freedom, authority, identity, and control. My images usually involve one subject, who is staged and directed in order to portray these themes. With 'Impaired', the photographs demonstrate themes of freedom and torture surrounding the human body. This series attempts to raise the question of where freedom begins and ends when dealing with a naked body."



Carrie Levy's interest in portraying the human body stems from the period of time her father was incarcerated in prison, documented in 51 Months, the time he was absent from their home and how this absence was felt. "My fear during my father's incarceration manifested in his loss of control over his identity and his body. This fear has now become my fascination throughout my photographic practice".



All sitters in this new body of photographs are friends and family of the photographer, as she confronts their identity and the ability of the camera to be used 'as a weapon'.
Artworks will be added shortly