MACO 2012
Laureana Toledo Boo Saville littlewhiteheadWed 18 Apr 2012 - Sun 22 Apr 2012
TJ Boulting is delighted to participate in the Nuevas Propuestas section at MACO 2012. The gallery will present Mexican artist Laureana Toledo, who was also presented at last year’s fair, as well as new British artists Boo Saville and Littlewhitehead.
TJ Boulting is delighted to participate in the Nuevas Propuestas section at MACO 2012. The gallery will present Mexican artist Laureana Toledo, who was also presented at last year’s fair, as well as new British artists Boo Saville and Littlewhitehead.

Laureana Toledo is a Mexican artist whose work often utilises popular culture and music as well as photography and found objects. Her project ‘The Limit’ originally for Art Sheffield in 2005 was recently published by Trolley Books and the film screened at MACO in 2010 as part of the VIP programme in association with OMR gallery. She has shown extensively in Mexico including most recently at Sala de Arte Publico Siqueiros and Museo Archivo de la Fotografica in Mexico City. In the UK she has shown at Site Gallery, Sheffield and Eastside Projects, Birmingham, as well as completed a residency at Gasworks.


Boo Saville is a British artist living and working in London who is represented by TJ Boulting, and will be having her third solo show at the gallery in May 2012. The work presented at MACO will be from the new body of work in progress, which involves continued and innovative use of drawing with the biro pen, but this time in colour. There will be some new abstract work, solid colour fields of biro, as well as figurative drawings on themes that interest the artist of the archeological, ritualistic and psychological. She has had solo and group shows in London as well as Milan, whilst her work has been acquired by the Museum of New and Old Art, Tazmania. She has recently been selected as one of the artists in the publication ‘100 New Artists’ by Francesca Gavin. On her work exhibited at MACO, Saville stated:
"The colour field drawings came out of a point in my practice where I wanted to remove the element of theme or subject. The drawing itself has now become the phenomena, the thing in itself. I have been slowly removing image from my work in order to access another reaction to it.
The experience of the drawing is the work, it isn’t ‘about’ anything and is not an illustration of an idea. They are philosophical manifestos about the beauty of futility. I am interested that the labour inherent in making the drawing is the only way that it can be made, no machine, no reproduction, just time. I believe there is a powerful sense of emotion communicated through this endeavour."


Littlewhitehead are an artistic duo from Glasgow, Scotland. Their work seeks to disturb or unsettle the viewer through deceptive appearances or surreal situations or juxtapositions, often employing a dark sense of humour. Their work has already been shown internationally including solo shows in London and Los Angeles and at art fairs in London, Madrid and Bologna. Most notably their work was acquired and shown at the Saatchi Gallery, London, and the Museum of South Australia, Adelaide. They too were selected as one of the artists in the recent book ‘100 New Artists’ by Francesca Gavin.
True to their practice of "trying to make something new from something old", the pair have taken "holiday snaps from the 1970s", found in a cupboard at a thrift store, as the starting point for their pieces - blowing them up or translating them into sculptural form. Although not the artists' usual form of representation, ("Usually when we recreate from photos, the scene is larger, a more immersive installation.") 'We Care Nothing For You're Joy' typifies littlewhitehead's artistic sentiment of humour and irreverence, mocking preconceptions: "the history of the bust is one of ceremony, celebration and monument. For us it's more irrelevant, funnier to create a bust of someone anonymous, a flash photograph of a working man from back in the 1970s." Viewing their work is akin to overhearing a conversation between the pair - this private dialogue is central to littlewhitehead's work.