DILATE
David RickardThu 15 Mar 2007 - Sun 15 Apr 2007
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David Rickard"s paintings fundamentally explore the base materials of painting, isolating the concept to its purest state in the examination of canvas and paint.
David Rickard"s paintings fundamentally explore the base materials of painting, isolating the concept to its purest state in the examination of canvas and paint.

Rickard has previously applied a playful but considered subversion to the usage of materials in his work, from balloons that breathe on their own, inflating and deflating, to a refrigerator covered in icing.



Each work in the Dilate series of 10 paintings measures 100x100 cm and consists of 10 shades of grey acrylic paint on stretched canvas, that carefully replicate a central 1x1 cm area of raw canvas. Translating this raw material to an enlarged 100:1 scale representation refers directly to each work's own material, yet also as a series refers to the base materials of painting in general. Each work contains at once pure real material, the small square of original canvas, and an enlarged visual representation of this reality through paint. However, there exists an inability to view both original and representation simultaneously due to the differing scales, close up the raw canvas can be scrutinised, whilst from afar only the painted simulation is revealed. The restrained palette of grey acrylic tones, layered like topographical contours, map the terrain of each canvas creating a series of painted monochromatic landscapes.



Also forming part of the exhibition are three spherical sculptures. They too explore a shifting literal usage of raw material, self-referential to their individual components. 'One hundred thousand' is constructed from exactly 100,000 individual 'hundreds and thousands', the brightly garish cake decoration, each glued one by one to create a perfect sphere. It plays in an irreverent way with the name of the material, labouring the primary structure of 100,000 individual components to the point of literal extreme. Similarly 'Sleeper Cell' holds the potential explosive energy of thousands of unlit matches, formed as a self-supporting hollow ball with red sulphurous tips exposed outwards. Finally 'Hair Ball' is literally as it reads, constructed over three years directly from the artist's own hair.



David Rickard was selected for the Jerwood Sculpture Prize in 2005, and presented by Trolley Gallery at Zoo Art Fair 2006. He was born in New Zealand in 1975, and following the completion of his Bachelor of Architecture at Auckland University in 1998 he travelled to Italy where he studied fine art at Brera Academia di Belli Arti, Milan. This proved a formative period in his artistic practice, working in the environment of Arte Povera artists such as Diego Esposito and Luciano Fabro, whose early experimental explorations of concept and material were an influence. In 2001 Rickard moved to London, and during 2002-03 was an associate student of the Masters of Fine Art Course at Central Saint Martins School of Art and Design. David Rickard has been part of numerous group and solo projects both in the UK as well as Italy and Bulgaria. He currently lives and works in London.
Artworks will be added shortly