On the traces of B.K.
VedovamazzeiThu 24 Jun 2004 - Tue 20 Jul 2004
The first UK solo show by Italian artist duo Vedovamazzei (Stella Scala and Simeone Crispino), the exhibition accompanied Trolley's publication of the book Natural History, which gathers all the watercolours the duo have produced since they met. Their practice combines a conceptual rigorous framework with irony and graceful transfiguration, turning familiar objects and situations into concrete poetry, invested by personal emotive charge.
The first UK solo show by Italian artist duo Vedovamazzei (Stella Scala and Simeone Crispino), the exhibition accompanied Trolley's publication of the book Natural History, which gathers all the watercolours the duo have produced since they met. Their practice combines a conceptual rigorous framework with irony and graceful transfiguration, turning familiar objects and situations into concrete poetry, invested by personal emotive charge.

The exhibition at Trolley Gallery consisted of a variety of works referencing Buster Keaton's films and stage props. In the main space the artists showed a collection of notebooks produced while one of them was in LA to follow Keaton's traces. The work is the result of long conversations over the phone in which Stella, who was in USA, was reporting on the day's research progress. While listening to this, Simeone drew every detail of the narrative taking shape again in his imagination. The protagonists of these stories, humans and architecture, was cut out and raised by the artists in order to create a cityscape filtered by their transoceanic communication. The episodes depicted include ranging form the story of Orson Wells bumping into a decayed and abandoned Keaton washing dishes in a restaurant, to George Michael's arrest.



Contrasting the modern investigations in the West Coast glamour, the artists have recreated a Japanese painting using a kitchen table and coloured tapes. The representation of waves in traditional illustration becomes another landscape whose abstraction is pushed to the utmost limit. Meanwhile in the basement, hidden from the exposed window of the gallery, visitors can come across a hidden chair and its story, a specially commissioned installation. Akin to the animated objects of One Week, the chair takes on a fictional persona who hides under tables or behind armchairs as a manifestation of shyness and fragility. Trapped under a transparent vitrine, the back of the chair is cut and reassembled to be at the same level of the seat. This feature allows the reserved object to assume anthropomorphic postures, making him or her live an independent life.
Artworks will be added shortly